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We were enjoying cappuccino and chatting about the somewhat ambiguous relationship between ‘mental health’ and ‘addiction’. Not being experts, the questions we raised only represent the view from the bottom – or, more precisely, they only represent our own coffee time discussion.

  • Why do campaign groups big support organisations, medical and government sources seem very reluctant to include addiction as a mental health issue? Certainly they all mention addiction but it seems to us that it is put in a box of its own and not given anything like the prominence of, for instance, depression and anxiety.
  • This seems odd especially because it is well known that depression and anxiety alone are very closely related with substance and behavioural addictions. They may lead to addictions via ‘self medication’ or the impulse to escape intolerable pain; both are likely consequences of addiction. It’s a cycle.
  • We are aware of the concept of  ‘dual diagnosis’ or ‘comorbidity’ where addiction is often accompanied by another mental health disorder. We are aware too that this is well known among professionals and has been researched and discussed for decades. There are organisations dedicated to researching and promoting discussion around dual diagnosis, such as Progress and many others but in practice we believe on the ground support and awareness is patchy geographically or non-existent.
  • Give that some mental health disorders such as gambling addiction and bipolar have high rates of comorbid substance abuse we find it odd that publicity around the issue is very feeble.
  • Anti-stigma campaigns around mental health issues are to be celebrated if they are evidenced as effective. Stigma is a huge barrier to recovery, seeking treatment and engaging socially. Yet we are not aware of any ongoing, well-resourced anti-stigma campaigns relating to addiction.
  • In our next post we consider the prevalence of addiction in the UK. We are concerned that a great deal of suffering is not being as adequately addressed as it could and should be.